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In light of the current coronavirus outbreak, there is no doubt that concerns and worries are circulating regarding what to expect during labor and delivery. News reports have been coming in quick succession, and information seems to change depending on the outlet information is garnered from. This makes it challenging to know what to believe and which sources to trust. We understand.

As a full-service adoption agency, Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Reno promises to keep you as updated as we can. Our very own Amanda Travers, Director of Social Services and Birth Parent Programs, is here to impart her wisdom on what birth mothers can expect in the hospital during the coronavirus.

TK: How can birth mothers prepare their hospital plan during the coronavirus?

AT: We are seeing hospitals change the way they conduct business every day because of the coronavirus. So, most importantly, the best thing that birth parents can do is remain flexible and keep an open mind. When a birth mother arrives at the hospital, she will save herself a lot of headaches by simply remembering that we are all moving and changing with this virus. Nothing is constant right now. This could very well mean that her prepared hospital plan is no longer an option.

TK: What if a birth mother has tested positive for COVID-19? Is she still able to give birth at the hospital?

AT: This is a medical question, and each birth mother’s case may differ on this. So, please be sure to seek answers from your medical professional. From the little we know, though, birth mothers can expect to give birth in the hospital during the coronavirus. With the information we don’t know, the best thing to do is call your doctor for the latest details regarding your particular pregnancy.

TK: What restrictions have been put in place in the hospital during the coronavirus?

AT:  Most of our hospitals have created strict restrictions due to the coronavirus to ensure everyone’s health and safety. Two of the biggest ones to be aware of are:

  1. New check-in procedures – Birth mothers are not allowed to enter the hospital without first being screened for the coronavirus. Most hospitals have stations set up outside the their entrances in order to check for fever and other coronavirus symptoms. If you are symptom-free, you are allowed to enter the hospital to receive treatment. On the other hand, if you show symptoms of coronavirus, you are taken immediately to an isolated area for treatment. If you show signs of allergies, cold or any other non-emergent issues, the hospital will ask you to come back when you are symptom-free.
  2. No Visitor Policy – Pregnant women who are giving birth or have just given birth are more at risk. Most hospitals are implementing a strict “no visitor policy” and asking us – the adoption professionals – to conduct our business via Skype, Zoom or other electronic meeting apps. If we need to provide paperwork to our clients, the hospital staff will schedule a “visiting time” for no more than one hour. Birth mothers are allowed one visitor, which is most often her birthing partner.

TK: How will the baby be delivered safely to the adoptive parents post-birth?Amanda Travers

AT: Because things are operating differently in the hospital during the coronavirus, adoptive parents are not allowed to visit and must wait until the baby is discharged. The adoption caseworker will get the baby from the hospital and transport him or her to either our office or directly to the adoptive parents after any and all placement paperwork has been completed.

TK: Are there extra precautions a birth mother can take during the coronavirus outbreak?

AT: I would highly recommend that she follow her state’s current quarantine procedures and remain at home as much as possible to prevent any potential coronavirus exposure. For precautions relating to her pregnancy, she should consult with her OB/GYN, who will have the best information pertaining to her specific pregnancy.

TK: Should the birth mother have a contingency plan for delivery?

AT: As far as we’ve seen, expectant mothers are able to be in the hospital during the coronavirus to give birth. Therefore, I would say that it’s not so much that she should have a contingency plan. Rather, as I stated in the beginning, she should keep an open mind and be flexible.

TK: How can a birth mother protect her newborn from being exposed to COVID-19?

AT: There is so much we still don’t know about this coronavirus, so it’s important to follow CDC guidelines. Wash your hands, don’t touch your face, wear a mask if you are feeling sick. Make sure to wash your hands before touching your baby or breast pump. The “no visitor policy” is there to prevent anyone who is sick or who has been exposed from being around your baby. Along those same lines, don’t let anyone who is sick or has been exposed to the coronavirus touch, hold or feed your baby. For any further concerns, or if you have questions relating to your particular circumstance, please seek medical advice.

TK: Do you have any advice for birth mothers preparing to be in the hospital during the coronavirus?

AT: Don’t panic! Many women are delivering healthy babies daily, even during this coronavirus pandemic. Be sure to follow any guidelines your doctor has given you along with your state’s current quarantine procedures. If you do this, you are less likely to contract the virus and can better protect you and your baby.

In the Hospital During the Coronavirus 

It is our responsibility at Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Reno to make sure your pregnancy and hospital experience go as smoothly as possible during this challenging time. There are many unknowns about how this virus operates, but scientists and medical professionals are working diligently to bring us accurate answers as quickly as they can. In the meantime – as Amanda stated – listen to your doctor and medical care team and follow CDC guidelines. This is the best information we have to tell you regarding what you can expect to experience in the hospital during the coronavirus.

We will get through this together, one day at a time. Life will regain normalcy soon. In the meantime, remember we are always here for you. Don’t hesitate to reach out if you have any other questions or concerns. We look forward to hearing from you!

Adoption Choices of Nevada

Adoption Choices, Inc. is a private, non-profit adoption agency licensed by the state and leader in the adoption community. We have been assisting birth parents, children, and adoptive parents since 2002. Our staff has a genuine commitment to providing an empathetic, empowering, and progressive experience to all involved in the adoption process.  If you are currently in the process of adopting a baby and have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact Adoption Choices of Nevada. You may visit the website here or contact us by 775-825-4673 (Reno Office) or 702-474-4673 (Las Vegas Office). Our hours are Monday through Friday, 9am-5pm PST.

Support Adoption Choices

CrowdriseAdoption Choices, Inc. is partnering with Crowdrise, a fundraising website for nonprofits, to help our adoptive parents and birth parents with much needed financial assistance. We understand that expenses keep clients from fulfilling their dreams. Both with birth parents making a plan for adoption, and with adoptive parents growing their family. It is our mission to provide financial assistance through grants and scholarships, awarded annually in November, in honor of National Adoption Month. Funds assist adoptive parents with matching and placements, adoption finalization and helping birth mothers improve their lives through higher education — and much more.

However, we can’t do it alone. Please read up on our programs and donate money where you are able. Your donation will make a huge impact.

About the Author

Tia KitchensTia Kitchens is a college graduate with a B.S in Psychology from Capella University who has always had a passion for three things: animals, writing, and mac ‘n cheese. Two of these three are things she has based her work around. Animals are a big impact on her life due to her love for helping others through difficult situations. Through her studies, she has found the human-animal bond is strong enough to help others. This, paired with her writing, helps her record her findings and teach others through her words.

She is excited to join Adoption Choices as an Editorial Intern because she’s wanted to adopt since she was little, and is excited to learn about the industry and the adoption journey.

Her goal is to make a change in the world with her words and end up on someone’s inspiration Pinterest board! Being a key quote on someone’s Pinterest board it shows her words have a huge impact on people. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but if that picture is just words it surely means more that way! To learn more about her, follow her on Twitter and Instagram!

We are operating full service during this time and will not be shutting down operations. Please let us know how we can help.

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