Surrogacy FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions for:

  • Intended Parents
  • Surrogates (Gestational Carriers)

Surrogacy helps those who are unable to have children become parents. Gestational surrogacy is a method of assisted reproduction where intended parents work with a gestational surrogate who will carry and care for their baby(ies) until birth. Intended parents use surrogacy to start or grow their families when they can’t do so on their own. It’s a process that requires medical and legal expertise, as well as a strong support process throughout the journey.

Through IVF, embryos are created in a lab at a fertility clinic. Sometimes the intended parents use their own genetic material. Sometimes, an egg donor is required. At the fertility clinic, 1-2 embryos are implanted into a gestational carrier, who carries the baby(ies) to term.
 

While it’s relatively simple to understand ‘What is Surrogacy?”, understanding the process is a bit more involved. The surrogacy process can be complex, and working with an experienced agency like Adoption and Surrogacy Choices helps navigate the milestones and provides support when you need it most.

A general overview of the surrogacy process looks like this:

  • Apply as a surrogate or as an intended parent
  • Meet all requirements (surrogates) and complete initial consultation (intended parents)
  • Surrogate and Parent Matching
  • Medical screenings, surrogate medications, and embryo transfer
  • Confirmation of pregnancy
  • Delivery day and beyond

There are two types of surrogacy: gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy. In a typical gestational surrogacy arrangement, intended parents create embryos through in vitro fertilization. One or more of these embryos is implanted in a surrogate (sometimes known as a gestational carrier), who carries the child or children to term, but has no genetic relationship to them. Gestational surrogacies make up the vast majority of modern surrogacy arrangements. 

By contrast, traditional surrogates typically become pregnant through artificial insemination, and have a genetic connection to the child or children they carry for their intended parents. At Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Nevada, we only provide gestational surrogacy services.

No, your surrogate mother will not share any DNA with your baby. She will carry your baby but won’t transfer any DNA to them. It will be like you carried your baby and gave some of your DNA to him or her, but another woman is carrying your baby for you.

If you have a traditional surrogacy, yes. She is contributing her egg with whomever’s sperm to create the embryo, which is your child. She will transfer some of her DNA to your baby, including physical features. Traditional surrogacy is not used in many states, including Nevada.

Surrogacy is a complicated process, and the subject of whether or not a surrogate mother is biologically related to the intended parent’s child is also complicated. Through gestational surrogacy, the intended mother’s fertilized egg is placed into a surrogate mother’s uterus. All this is done in a lab. Because of this, the surrogate mother is not biologically related to the baby. 

If the intended parents do not go the route through gestational surrogacy, they will have to have an egg or sperm donated. This could be where a surrogate mother could be related to the baby. If the surrogate mother is related to the intended parents, such as a sister, mother, or cousin, there will be a biological connection. 

If you are going through gestational surrogacy, the answer is no. Your baby will look like you and your partner. You and your partner both contributed the egg and the sperm to create the embryo that she carries. The surrogate mother does not have any biological connection to your baby. Your surrogate mother will carry your baby but won’t give your baby any physical features or genes.

If you are having a traditional surrogacy, which means that she contributed her egg to become pregnant, then yes. The baby will look like her, and whomever’s sperm was used to create the embryo. This will be the only way your baby will look like the surrogate mother.

Surrogacy allows couples and individuals from a variety of backgrounds, ages, and sexual orientations to build their families.

Intended parents who use surrogacy include:

  • Heterosexual couples who have struggled with infertility
  • Intended mothers who are unable to carry a child
  • Intended parents who have a genetic defect or health condition they don’t want to pass onto the child
  • Same sex intended parents who want to have a genetic link to their baby

Each surrogacy journey is unique!

Surrogate mother pay depends on a few factors: where she lives, if she has insurance, and whether or not she’s a first time carrier. On average, surrogate mothers are paid a base fee of $30k-$40k, plus additional compensation and benefits.

If you live in the U.S. you can estimate surrogacy costs around $108K-$156K for a journey, exclusive of IVF costs. The actual journey costs depend on the services intended parents need, your insurance and the details of your specific journey. Each journey is unique – there is no “one cost fits all”.

The monetary benefits of becoming a surrogate mother are significant, but the indescribable sense of fulfillment our surrogates get from helping intended families bring a child into the world cannot be found doing anything else.

Surrogate pay depends on a few factors: where the surrogate lives, whether or not she has insurance, and if she’s an experienced gestational carrier.

Surrogates can earn up to $60k in pay and benefits.

The length of the process depends on several factors. We typically tell intended parents that they should plan on a year and a half from the time they sign on with our agency until they have a child, although it can be quicker or longer depending on the legal requirements involved and the course of the IVF treatment.

Starting your surrogacy journey begins with a consultation with our experienced team. You’ll speak with a surrogacy specialist. In this meeting you’ll have an opportunity to share your story with us and why you’ve chosen surrogacy to grow your family, and we’ll explain about our process and program offerings, and answer any questions you have.

Once we have accepted a surrogate applicant into our program, our matching and legal teams determine possible matching options based on a variety of factors, including: the state she lives in, whether she has insurance, and the matching preferences from both intended parents and surrogates.

We will send the redacted profile of the intended parents (with no identifying information) to the surrogate. If she expresses interest, we will send her profile to the intended parents, similarly leaving out all identifying information. Once the surrogate and the prospective parents express a mutual interest, we will put them in touch by telephone, Skype or email so they can begin to get to know each other.

After communicating with each other, the surrogate and the prospective parents meet in person at their mutual convenience: at the surrogate’s home, the intended parents’ home, or some place in between. If the surrogate has children and/or a partner or spouse, the intended parents meet them as well.

An IVF physician medically screens them after a match is made. If for any reason the surrogate doesn’t pass the medical screening (which is rare), Adoption and Surrogacy Choices presents a new match.

This truly depends on several factors, but your doctor will have the final say for how many times you can be a surrogacy. Along with your fertility clinic and your chosen surrogacy agency, your doctor will see all of the different factors and determine how many times you can be a surrogate.

Contact us here at Adoption Choices of Nevada, and we have many professionals who can help you with everything surrogacy. In Nevada, you can’t have any more than five vaginal births or three cesarean births. There are several factors to consider when determining how many surrogacies a single mother can go through. The decision will ultimately be up to your doctor, your fertility clinic, and your chosen surrogacy agency. Talk to one of our surrogacy professionals to learn more about how many times you can become a surrogate mother.

No. A surrogate mother cannot decide to keep the baby after giving birth. Surrogate mothers have certain rights in surrogacy, but no the right to have any legal custody of the child. When a surrogate mother decides to move forward with intended parents, they legally must hand over the baby to the intended parents. They will legally have to sign away parental consent, and the baby will legally become the intended parent’s responsibility. 

There may be cases where the surrogate mother decides that she wants custody of a baby after giving birth. But, the surrogate mother has no legal authority to claim custody, especially if it is a gestational surrogacy and the baby is not biologically hers. Per her agreement with the intended parents, she must hand over custody and parents’ rights to them after giving birth. 

 

Now, if the intended parents decide they no longer want to pursue surrogacy and parenthood, the surrogate mother will have the right to have custody and pursue parental responsibility.

With the ever-developing and improving science surrounding infertility, insemination, and pregnancy, surrogacy has never seen such high rates of success. The CDC says that there is a 55% of success when there is a transfer of embryos into a surrogate mother. That is a great chance for a successful pregnancy and delivery! 

It is important to state that there are things out of our control when it comes to pregnancy and giving birth. There can be complications, and things can come up that could impact the success of surrogacy. But, overall, due to the improving science surrounding surrogacy, the chances of success are high! 

It is not required that a surrogate mother is within a certain distance from a surrogate agency. It is recommended that they at least be within a reasonable driving distance to the agency. 

Having the agency close to you is not just for the benefit of meetings for surrogacy with a legal team and intended parents. It is for the surrogate mother’s benefit. At a surrogacy agency, you will find a community of people that will surround you and lift you up. You will have the emotional support that you need to get you through your pregnancy and delivery. 

Openness, honesty, and communication are core values at Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Nevada. We encourage building meaningful relationships that will continue to exist throughout the life of the child. Intended Parents are encouraged to visit their surrogate in her home town at least once – and when possible, more often – to get to knew her family and where she’s from.
 

Most of our surrogates already have relationships with an obstetrician/gynecologist (OB/GYN) and many will deliver at the same hospital where they gave birth to their own children. All surrogates will deliver at a hospital near their home. The decision about where to deliver is typically made in conjunction with the OBGYN and the insurance company, which may have a network of approved providers and hospitals. Occasionally, our legal team will recommend that a delivery occur at a specific hospital.

Intended parents often wish to be a part of the labor and delivery process. Hospital policy and your surrogate’s comfort play a large role in determining who will be able to be present in the delivery room. Following the birth, the baby will either remain in the nursery or a room assigned to you. According to most hospital policies, the child cannot be released from the hospital until the surrogate has been released.

Some surrogates have had a personal experience with infertility and are eager to help a couple or individual to become parents. Others may feel that their family is complete but love being pregnant and feel that helping prospective parents is a greater calling. What unites all of them is the desire to help a family grow.

A woman applies to become a surrogate with Adoption and Surrogacy Choices by filling out a detailed questionnaire. We review her answers and if we think she would be a good fit for our program, a consulting IVF physician examines her medical records, including a history of recent pregnancies. Our legal team reviews any medical insurance plans. Next, she participates in a detailed assessment by phone with one of our licensed social workers. We evaluate the applicant’s support network and run a criminal background and bankruptcy/judgment history check on her and her husband/partner.
 

We’ve established strict requirements for our surrogate applicants to ensure the continued success of our program. Here are some of our requirements for surrogate applicants:

  • Has delivered a child of her own, and is currently parenting at least one child
  • 21-41 years of age
  • Is a citizen, legal resident or legal immigrant of the United States
  • No participation in certain government aid programs
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) of no higher than 33,
  • Residence in a surrogacy-friendly state in the United States
  • Support of family and friends
  • No use of illegal drugs, cigarettes, or alcohol abuse
  • No currently use of anti-depressants
  • Leads a stable, responsible lifestyle

Our legal team coordinates with local attorneys to ensure that you are properly matched with a surrogate in a state where you can accomplish the necessary legal work to finalize your parental rights. You will need to have wills finalized prior to the embryo transfer that ensure that a guardian is in place to care for your children in the event of your death (if you live in the United States, our legal team can draft these for you). Once you are matched, we negotiate contracts on your behalf with independent attorneys who represent the egg donor and/or surrogate. We work with local attorneys in the states where the surrogates reside in order to accomplish the legal work necessary to secure your parental rights. Depending on a variety of factors, your surrogacy legal work may include a pre-birth order, a voluntary acknowledgement of paternity, a judgment of paternity, a custody orders, or an adoption.
 

Again, if you live outside the United States, you may find it advantageous to work with an immigration and/or citizenship specialist from your home country. You may also need to consult with a family law attorney in your country for help finalizing your parental rights when you return. Finally, some intended parents hire an independent attorney to review our Agreement for Services before signing on with us. Most people do not feel it necessary to find counsel for this purpose, but they do review the Agreement carefully and occasionally request edits and make comments before signing.

Once you have joined our program, however, our legal team will act as your counsel for all legal matters related to the surrogacy in the United States. We will represent you for the negotiation of any contracts with the surrogate and egg donor and will work with local attorneys across the United States to finalize your parental rights.

Yes, you will work with an attorney during this surrogacy journey, and he or she will establish your parental rights through a pre-birth order. You will receive, and everyone in the surrogacy will sign a contract that relinquishes the surrogate’s rights of the child, giving these rights to you.

This is a huge legal process of the surrogacy process, so if you don’t understand it fully, that is okay! You can contact us at any time, and we will happily answer any questions you have. We know it can be overwhelming, so we are here for you if you have any questions about any part of surrogacy.

Yes. Thanks to the Special Program of Assisted Reproduction (SPAR), intended parents who are HIV+ are able to grow their families with surrogacy. Through a sperm washing technique and HIV testing, it is possible for HIV+ men to safely father a biological child of their own with no risk to the baby or surrogate.
 

Of course! We work with intended parents of all backgrounds—single individuals, same-sex couples, and heterosexual couples.
 

You may want a surrogate you choose to already be close to you, someone you already trust and love. This way, you won’t have to go through the process of matching with a surrogate mother and find that trust you already have with your own mother with her. You may wonder if one of your friends or family could be your surrogate. This is a possibility for you.

You can choose your mother to be your surrogate, and this can alleviate a lot of stress from you because you already have trust and love for her. Even though she won’t be the legal mother of your child, you already know that she will have a great connection with him or her. This can help you be more comfortable with the surrogacy process because your surrogate will still be in your life after the birth of your child.

Adoption and surrogacy are both expensive processes and can affect your decisions on both. Adoption costs an average of $40,000, and surrogacy costs an average of $75,000. This all depends on which state you are in. Surrogacy is the more expensive option of the two, which can discourage a lot of people from choosing this option. We understand that this may be your only option to have biological children, so there are a few financing options when choosing surrogacy. You can contact us here at Adoption Choices of Nevada and connect with a surrogacy professional who can provide information and answer any of your financial questions.

Although it is not expected or necessary, you may want to give your surrogate a gift. The surrogate mother you choose will carry and birth you and your partner’s baby. This is a huge responsibility, so giving her a gift would be a great way to share your appreciation for her.

There are multiple gift ideas that you can choose from—something small and meaningful like jewelry, handmade gifts, flowers, even food. You can also get her gifts that will help her during her pregnancy, like maternity clothes, a pregnancy survival kit that you put together, even a spa day because she is carrying your baby, and that is a hard job. This is optional, but it can show how much you appreciate her sacrifice for you and your partner.



There are few risks to consider if you are thinking about becoming a surrogate. 

Pregnancy and giving birth is not an easy journey to undertake. There are inherent risks involved with pregnancy and delivery that all women are aware of but are still risky nonetheless. Surrogate mothers also have to consider additional risks from the fertility medication used to transfer embryos into their uteruses. The fertility medication can often cause side effects that are similar to pregnancy, such as nausea, swelling, and back pain. 

There are also emotional risks with surrogacy, but not in the way that many people think, such as regretting going through the pregnancy and placing the child with the intended family. Many surrogate mothers experience stress from balancing their lives with surrogacy, fatigue, and postpartum depression.

Yes! For many intended parents, seeking out a surrogate in their own family is a great option. 

Any family member can be your surrogate as long as they meet all the medical and psychological requirements for a surrogate mother. It is also important that before you or any family member makes such an important decision as surrogacy, that you have plenty of time to think things over. Give your relative time to ponder whether or not moving forward with becoming your surrogate is a good option for them. As long as there is a mutual understanding between both your family member and the pair of you, there is no reason why your husband’s sister can’t be your surrogate! 

Yes! Attitudes towards surrogacy have changed and evolved over the last decade. Society is becoming more accepting of the idea of surrogacy, particularly surrogacy amongst family members. More and more, mothers of intended parents are being asked to carry a child. And there is nothing wrong with that at all! 

 

Any family member can be your surrogate, as long as they meet all the medical and psychological requirements for a surrogate. And even more important than that, all parties must have open and honest conversations about expectations and outcomes for surrogacy. As long as there is a mutual understanding between all parties involved, your husband’s mom can be your surrogate!

Yes! Any member of your family is eligible to become your surrogate. For many intended parents, this is a great option. When considering a family member as a potential surrogate, be sure to have open and honest conversations about what that surrogacy could look like.  Have conversations about expectations and the outcomes of surrogacy. Give her time to think about it and make the best decision for herself. 

As long as your sister meets all of the medical and psychological requirements that we require at our surrogate agency, there is no reason why she can’t be your surrogate! 

Surrogacy helps those who are unable to have children become parents. Gestational surrogacy is a method of assisted reproduction where intended parents work with a gestational surrogate who will carry and care for their baby(ies) until birth. Intended parents use surrogacy to start or grow their families when they can’t do so on their own. It’s a process that requires medical and legal expertise, as well as a strong support process throughout the journey.

Gestational Surrogacy is the process by which a fertilized embryo is implanted in a gestational carrier, who will carry the resulting child/children to term, but bears no genetic relationship to them. These are the types of arrangements that we facilitate. By contrast, traditional surrogates are both genetic and gestational mothers, and undergo artificial insemination and relinquish custody of the resulting child/children upon birth.
 

Through IVF, embryos are created in a lab at a fertility clinic. Sometimes the intended parents use their own genetic material. Sometimes, an egg donor is required. At the fertility clinic, 1-2 embryos are implanted into a gestational carrier, who carries the baby(ies) to term.

Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Nevada offers a comprehensive benefits package for all surrogates. We are flexible, and as a surrogate, you can customize your benefits and how you’ll use your payments. Surrogate compensation varies depending on your insurance, state of residence, whether you’ve been a surrogate before, and the terms outlined in your Agreement. 

Surrogate pay depends on a few factors: where the surrogate lives, whether or not she has insurance, and if she’s an experienced gestational carrier.

Surrogates can earn up to $60k in pay and benefits.

No. If you do have medical insurance coverage, we’ll take a look at the plan to see if it is likely to cover surrogacy. If so, you may be entitled to a higher base fee. But if you don’t have insurance, it’s not a problem. We’ll find a plan that will cover you and your intended parents will pay any associated costs.
 

Your insurance company (or the surrogate maternity insurance coverage we obtain for you and your intended parents) will pay most of the bills related to your pregnancy and delivery. If there are any additional unexpected costs, your intended parents will cover those costs. The family you choose to work with will pay for all IVF medical procedures, expenses, co-payments, and deductibles related to your surrogate pregnancy.
 

As a surrogate, when you embark on a journey with us, we promise to be next to you every step of the way. We promise to educate, lead, and guide you through your surrogacy journey. We will work tirelessly to support you as you help make a family’s dream come true. 

Our two-way matching process focuses on finding the best fit for you and your intended parents. We offer extensive support to our surrogates from the moment you start researching through the pregnancy and delivery, and beyond. We have the highest level of dedication to our surrogates than any other surrogacy agency in Nevada. 

 

We believe working with an agency is to your advantage as we provide full support and guidance throughout the entire process. All aspects of the surrogacy journey are handled by our team, from matching, to screening, to legal work, to social work support. We handle any issues that may arise.
 

If you are interested in applying to our program to become a surrogate, you can email us here. You will be contacted within about 24 hours to inform you of the next steps.

Women interested in becoming surrogate mothers with us:

  • Must have delivered a child of their own, and is currently parenting at least one child.
  • Must have completed successful pregnancy and birth, without complications, as documented by medical records.
  • Must be between 21-41 years of age.
  • In most circumstances, must have a Body Mass Index (BMI) of no higher than 33.
  • Must be a citizen, legal resident or legal immigrant of the United States. If a surrogate is a legal resident or legal immigrant of the United States, the surrogate must be able to provide documentation that is valid for at least 2 years.
  • Must not participate in the following government aid programs: cash assistance, welfare, public housing and section 8. All other forms of government assistance will be considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • Must live in a surrogate-friendly state in the United States (we are very sorry but we cannot accept gestational carriers who reside in Nebraska, Louisiana or Michigan. We can begin accepting applications from New York starting at the end of 2020).
  • Must have a valid driver’s license.
  • Must have the support of her family. If married or partnered, the surrogate must have her partner’s support. Also, the surrogate and her partner/primary support person must agree to participate in a social work screening.
  • Must be financially secure.
  • Must lead a stable, responsible lifestyle.
  • Must be willing to travel to a fertility clinic for the in-vitro fertilization (IVF) process. Please note, often these trips include overnight stays.
  • Must not use illegal drugs, smoke cigarettes, or abuse alcohol.

We are unable to accept applicants who are enrolled in certain government programs, including cash assistance, welfare, public housing, and Section 8 housing. The income requirements for these programs are generally stricter than other programs, such as food stamps, WIC, and subsidized childcare. Reimbursements received while you are acting as a gestational surrogate could potentially make you ineligible for certain benefits.

Typically our surrogates and intended parents will meet each other via Skype call before moving forward with a match. We encourage both parties to get to know each other and to make sure you “click.” Occasionally, intended parents will fly out for an initial meeting. More often you will meet them in person for the first time at the screening or transfer stage.

You should expect whatever level of contact makes you comfortable, as every journey is unique. We do ask all of our intended parents to be in touch at least once a week from the time they meet you until delivery. Some people choose to have more frequent contact than this, especially around the time of the birth. However, it is not required. Before you cycle and during the pregnancy, you can expect phone calls, emails, and maybe an occasional visit, particularly for OB appointments and ultrasounds. After you deliver, we encourage our surrogate mothers and families to remain in contact through emails, phone calls, pictures and letters or maybe an occasional visit. Everyone is encouraged to do what makes them most comfortable. For most, the relationship develops naturally over time.
 

BMI guidelines are set by the IVF clinics. For surrogate mothers whose BMI is between 28-33, we require documentation that verifies your current BMI. The BMI requirements are established not only for health reasons, but also to ensure that you will respond appropriately to the medications necessary for this process.
 

Absolutely. Having your tubes tied will not affect your ability to be a successful surrogate.

Yes! If you are breastfeeding please feel free to apply and we can discuss a timeline that works best for you.
 

BMI is important when becoming a surrogate because it is for the health and wellness of yourself and the baby. If you are not at a certain healthy weight for your height, you will not be able to become a surrogate. In Nevada, you have to have a BMI within the range of 19-33. This is just so the doctors and the intended parents can have a less stressful time worrying about whether the baby will be healthy or not.

The answer to this question may seem daunting because it is a lot. Depending on your situation and how your pregnancy goes, your medications may vary. Check with your health care provider for more information, but here are some possible medications that you may have to take as a gestational surrogate and what they do to help:

  • Birth Control Pills These are optional and can be taken a few months before starting your surrogate pregnancy. This will prevent any possible conception of a biological child, and it will regulate your menstrual cycle prior to an embryo transfer.
  • Lupron You will take this one month before the embryo transfer. This prevents usual hormone exchange, which can cause follicle production and ovulation. It does this by suppressing pituitary stimulation to the ovaries.
  • Low Dose Aspirin should be taken to assist with cycle stimulation and impending embryonic implantation.
  • Estrogen helps grow the lining of the uterus, which will maintain an early pregnancy.
  • Progesterone is a hormone that helps with uterine lining preparation for the implantation of the embryo. This hormone helps with the maintenance of early pregnancy.
  • Medrol is a low-dose steroid pill that suppresses the autoimmune system from interfering with embryo implantation.
  • Doxycycline is a pre-cycle antibiotic that prevents any possible low-grade pelvic infection.

All of these medications help with the implantation of the embryo and help the pregnancy go smoothly. Although it is a lot, it will help you through your pregnancy and keep the intended parents with peace of mind that their child will have healthy growth and development.

You may experience symptoms similar to those you would experience during your monthly cycle, such as mood swings. Your hormones will be changing and these changes in mood are normal, as they are during any pregnancy.

There are certain things that agencies look for in potential surrogates that could disqualify them from becoming surrogate mothers. While we hate to disqualify anyone who wants to pursue such an honorable task, we must think of not only the surrogate’s health but the baby’s health as well. 

Things that could disqualify a potential surrogate could be things such as:

  • Being under 21, and over 39 
  • Being HIV positive 
  • Not being a US citizen with proof of citizenship 
  • Never having given birth to a child before 
  • Not meeting lifestyle requirements such as: 
    • Smoking
    • Excessive drinking 
    • Having a BMI above or below 18-31
    • Not living an overall healthy lifestyle 

With the ever-developing and improving science surrounding infertility, insemination, and pregnancy, surrogacy has never seen such high rates of success. The CDC says that there is a 55% of success when there is a transfer of embryos into a surrogate mother. That is a great chance for a successful pregnancy and delivery! 

It is important to state that there are things out of our control when it comes to pregnancy and giving birth. There can be complications, and things can come up that could impact the success of surrogacy. But, overall, due to the improving science surrounding surrogacy, the chances of success are high! 

There are few risks to consider if you are thinking about becoming a surrogate. 

Pregnancy and giving birth is not an easy journey to undertake. There are inherent risks involved with pregnancy and delivery that all women are aware of but are still risky nonetheless. Surrogate mothers also have to consider additional risks from the fertility medication used to transfer embryos into their uteruses. The fertility medication can often cause side effects that are similar to pregnancy, such as nausea, swelling, and back pain. 

 

There are also emotional risks with surrogacy, but not in the way that many people think, such as regretting going through the pregnancy and placing the child with the intended family. Many surrogate mothers experience stress from balancing their lives with surrogacy, fatigue, and postpartum depression. 

At this time we are unable to accept applicants who have experienced postpartum depression for which they were prescribed anti-depressants after their most recent delivery, numerous prior deliveries, or all prior deliveries.

In order to be considered to be a surrogate, you must have ceased using any anti-depressants or anti-anxiety medications for 6-12 months before applying to our program. In many cases, we may require supporting documentation from a prescribing doctor, prescription refill history, as well as other documentation.

We are sorry but we require that all surrogates and egg donors in our program have the full support of their husband or partner. If you are not married, you must have a support person in place with whom you will share the journey. Your primary support person will also have a screening with our social work team.

You cannot be a surrogate mother to a child you are currently carrying, as intended parents typically contribute their own genetic material to children born through surrogacy, and the surrogacy process requires a great deal of planning before you become pregnant. However, you might consider adoption as an alternative. Feel free to contact our office as we are a licensed adoption agency and can find a loving home for your baby.

Yes. You can ask for a daycare allowance or have your lost wages compensated so your children can be cared for while you are gone.

You select your OB or midwife for your prenatal care. We ask that if a midwife is chosen, that he/she is overseen by an OB. In the instance you are carrying multiples, you may be asked to see a maternal fetal medicine doctor.

If you have an OB/GYN that you see yearly, you can ask them about surrogacy. To qualify to be a surrogate mother, you will have to get a doctor’s note from your OB/GYN stating that you can be a surrogate mother. He or she will already have great knowledge of your past pregnancy or pregnancies and has been the main one to do your pap smears at yearly appointments, which is a requirement to have before you start your surrogate journey.

Yes. Your surrogate coordinator and your social worker will discuss your comfort level in transferring more than 1 embryo.

Guidelines vary from one IVF clinic to another. However, there is usually some type of modified bed rest required for 24-36 hours post-transfer.

In the surrogacy medical process, carriers are usually expected to abstain from sexual intercourse for 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after a transfer; however, your IVF clinic will give you more specific guidelines.

Physically speaking, the pregnancy is no different than a traditional pregnancy. Adoption and Surrogacy Choices and your medical providers will be there to answer any questions and support you in this process.

The law varies from state to state so it will depend on where you live as well as where your intended parents are from. The attorneys in our program take this into account when matching you with your intended parents. This attention to detail ensures all legal work can be accomplished. Sometimes this is done by a pre-birth order, sometimes by virtue of a single, or a second-parent adoption.

Yes. This legal aspect of surrogacy is taken care of before we proceed with a transfer.

We screen our intended parents to make an assessment of the stability in their relationship. If a divorce should occur, you would NOT have to assume care of the child. Custody would be worked out between the intended parents.

Your surrogate mother will not share any DNA with your baby. She will carry your baby but won’t transfer any DNA to them. It will be like you carried your baby and gave some of your DNA to him or her, but another woman is carrying your baby for you.

 

If you have a traditional surrogacy, yes. She is contributing her egg with whomever’s sperm to create the embryo, which is your child. She will transfer some of her DNA to your baby, including physical features. Traditional surrogacy is not used in many states, including Nevada.

This truly depends on several factors, but your doctor will have the final say for how many times you can be a surrogacy. Along with your fertility clinic and your chosen surrogacy agency, your doctor will see all of the different factors and determine how many times you can be a surrogate.

Contact us here at Adoption Choices of Nevada, and we have many professionals who can help you with everything surrogacy. In Nevada, you can’t have any more than five vaginal births or three cesarean births. There are several factors to consider when determining how many surrogacies a single mother can go through. The decision will ultimately be up to your doctor, your fertility clinic, and your chosen surrogacy agency. Talk to one of our surrogacy professionals to learn more about how many times you can become a surrogate mother.

It is not required that a surrogate mother is within a certain distance from a surrogate agency. It is recommended that they at least be within a reasonable driving distance to the agency. 

 

Having the agency close to you is not just for the benefit of meetings for surrogacy with a legal team and intended parents. It is for the surrogate mother’s benefit. At a surrogacy agency, you will find a community of people that will surround you and lift you up. You will have the emotional support that you need to get you through your pregnancy and delivery.

What Are My Next Steps To Surrogacy?

From your first contact with Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Nevada, we’re here to help you with the application process, screening, matching, legal representation, medical care, coordination of services and all steps in between! Begin by filling out the form below:

What Are My Next Steps
To Surrogacy?

From your first contact with Adoption and Surrogacy Choices of Nevada, we’re here to help you with the application process, screening, matching, coordination of services and all steps in between!

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